Friday Morning News Briefs and Weekend Weather

Posted: July 26, 2013

Winchester-Area Weather: Similar to Thursday to end the work week. Sunny today with a high of 81. Partly cloudy and 61 tonight. Temperatures will remain about the same for Saturday and Sunday, but a 60 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms, especially in the afternoon, each day. 

Morning News Briefs from the Associated Press for Friday, July 26, 2013

Ousted Egypt president detained over Hamas contact
CAIRO (AP) — An investigating judge has ordered the detention of Egypt's ousted president over alleged contacts with Hamas to help in his escape from prison in 2011, the official state news agency reported Friday in the first official word on Mohammed Morsi's status since he was overthrown by the military on July 3. The announcement came hours before mass protests were set to take place across the nation in response to a call by military chief Gen. Abdel-Fatah el-Sissi for a show of popular support for his anticipated crackdown on Morsi's supporters and radical Islamists loyal to the ousted leader who have been attacking security forces in the strategic Sinai Peninsula.

Police lower death count in Spain crash to 78
SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA, Spain (AP) — Police scientists examining the remains of those killed in Spain's worst train crash in decades lowered the death count from 80 people to 78 on Friday and said the count could change as they continue their work identifying body parts and associating them with others. Investigators, meanwhile, have taken possession of the "black boxes" of the train, which hurtled at high-speed along a curve and derailed, court spokeswoman Maria Pardo Rios said Friday. The boxes record train's trip data, including speed and distances and braking and are similar to flight recorders for airplanes.

Pope Francis urges Catholics to shake up dioceses
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Pope Francis has shown the world his rebellious side, urging young Catholics to shake up the church and make a "mess" in their dioceses by going out into the streets to spread the faith. It's a message he put into practice by visiting one of Rio's most violent slums and opening the church's World Youth Day on a rain-soaked Copacabana Beach. Francis was elected pope on a mandate to reform the church, and in four short months he has started doing just that: He has broken long-held Vatican rules on everything from where he lays his head at night to how saints are made. He has cast off his security detail to get close to his flock, and his first international foray as pope has shown the faithful appreciate the gesture.

Defense to give closing in Manning-WikiLeaks case
FORT MEADE, Md. (AP) — The defense gets the chance Friday to sum up its case in the court-martial of Bradley Manning, the Army private who sent hundreds of thousands of U.S. government documents to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks. Manning's civilian defense attorney David Coombs was scheduled to give his closing argument in the eighth week of the trial at the Fort Meade Army base outside Baltimore. The case will then go to the judge for deliberations, who has said she could rule anytime in the next several days.

Hedge funds: from rock stars to fallen stars?
NEW YORK (AP) — Hedge funds were once the rock stars of the financial industry. The smartest people worked for them. The wealthiest gave them their money. They were an easy path to fortune. But if that get-rich-quick narrative was an exaggeration before the financial crisis, it's even less true since. The hedge fund industry's performance has been spotty in recent years; its public image, bruised. SAC Capital Advisors became the latest high-flyer brought low when the Justice Department on Thursday accused it of allowing insider trading and making hundreds of millions of dollars illegally.

Snowden's remaining docs unlikely to tie US hands
WASHINGTON (AP) — It's the stuff of spy novels: The hunted-down protagonist wins in the end because he's got damaging documents squirreled away, a bargaining chip against the bureaucrats who want to silence him. If National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden thinks he's living in such a thriller, legal experts say he's got another think coming. Nothing he has is likely to scare off the prosecution.

Ginsburg says push for voter ID laws predictable
WASHINGTON (AP) — Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg says she's not surprised that Southern states have pushed ahead with tough voter identification laws and other measures since the Supreme Court freed them from strict federal oversight of their elections. Ginsburg said in an interview with The Associated Press that Texas' decision to implement its voter ID law hours after the court struck down a key provision of the Voting Rights Act last month was powerful evidence of an ongoing need to keep states with a history of voting discrimination from making changes in the way they hold elections without getting advance approval from Washington.

Korean divide lives on 60 years after end of war
PANMUNJOM, North Korea (AP) — Some Americans call it the "Forgotten War," a 1950s conflict fought in a far-off country and so painful that even survivors have tried to erase their memories of it. The North Koreans, however, have not forgotten. Sixty years after the end of the Korean War, the country is marking the milestone anniversary with a massive celebration Saturday for a holiday it calls "Victory Day" — even though the two sides only signed a truce, and have yet to negotiate a peace treaty.

Juror says she owes Martin's parents apology
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The second juror to speak publicly told ABC News in an interview made available Thursday that she feels George Zimmerman got away with murder for fatally shooting Trayvon Martin, but that there wasn't enough evidence at trial to convict him under Florida law. Juror B29 told Robin Roberts that she favored convicting Zimmerman of second-degree murder when deliberations began by the six-member, all-women jury.