twoResonate

Dan Miller on organ

WINCHESTER — Musical selections for horn and organ will be the next concert in the  Music on the Corner series at First Baptist Church, Winchester.

The concert takes place at 4 p.m. Sunday in the church sanctuary. The church is at 205 W. Piccadilly St., on the corner of Washington Street.

A freewill offering will be accepted to support the concert.

Sunday's performers will be the trombone and organ duo twoResonate, comprised of James Martin on trombone and Dan Miller on organ. They will be joined by special guests Alex Serio on trumpet and Brad Tatu on french horn. Each will perform several solos accompanied by Miller and all four will combine for the Trio on Engelberg by Libby Larsen.

All four performers are graduates of Shenandoah Conservatory and are active performers in the Washington, D.C., area and Philadelphia.

Miller is the organist at First Baptist Church, Winchester and also serves as accompanist for the SU Cantus Singers, the Blue Ridge Singers, the Valley Chorale of Front Royal, and is on the faculty of the Washington Opera Institute for Young Singers.

Martin currently holds the position of principal trombone with The American Pops Orchestra and is the second trombonist with Maryland Lyric Opera Orchestra. He has worked with a number of symphony and chamber orchestras in Europe and the United States.

Based in Philadelphia, Serio is currently the director of the Wynnefield Branch of Settlement Music School, where he is also on the trumpet faculty. He is also the founder and director of Ictus International Music Competition.

Tatum performs regularly as Principal Baroque Hornist with the Washington Bach Consort, fourth horn of the Washington Concert Opera Orchestra, and solo horn with the Saturday Morning Brass Project, Trio Brass Pastiche and the Opus 40 Ensemble. As a solo recitalist and clinician he has performed recitals demonstrating the history of the horn at James Madison University, Virginia Tech, Messiah College, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and more. He performs on multiple horns to expose audiences to the music and horns of each time period. .

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